Visit Ivory Coast

Ivory Coast

Ivory Coast, also known as Côte d'Ivoire, officially the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, is a country located on the south coast of West Africa. Ivory Coast's political capital is Yamoussoukro in the centre of the country, while its economic capital and largest city is the port city of Abidjan. It borders Guinea to the northwest, Liberia to the west, Mali to the northwest, Burkina Faso to the northeast, Ghana to the east, and the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic Ocean) to the south. The official language of the republic is French, with local indigenous languages also being widely used that include Baoulé, Dioula, Dan, Anyin, and Cebaara Senufo. In total, there are around 78 different languages spoken in Ivory Coast. The country has large populations of Muslims, Christians (primarily Roman Catholics) and various indigenous religions.

Good to know

Languages
French
Currencies
West African CFA franc (XOF)
Population
26.378.274 million
Time Zone
UTC
Visitors / year
2 million
Capital
Yamoussoukro

More about Ivory Coast

Before its colonization by Europeans, Ivory Coast was home to several states, including Gyaaman, the Kong Empire and Baoulé. The area became a protectorate of France in 1843 and was consolidated as a French colony in 1893 amid the European scramble for Africa. It achieved independence in 1960, led by Félix Houphouët-Boigny, who ruled the country until 1993. Relatively stable by regional standards, Ivory Coast established close political and economic ties with its West African neighbors while at the same time maintaining close relations to the West, especially France. Ivory Coast experienced a coup d'état in 1999 and two religiously-grounded civil wars, first between 2002 and 2007 and again during 2010–2011. In 2000, the country adopted a new constitution.

Ivory Coast is a republic with strong executive power vested in its president. Through the production of coffee and cocoa, the country was an economic powerhouse in West Africa during the 1960s and 1970s, though it went through an economic crisis in the 1980s, contributing to a period of political and social turmoil. It was not until around 2014 that the gross domestic product again reached the level of its peak in the 1970s. In the 21st century, the Ivorian economy has been largely market-based, and it still relies heavily on agriculture, with smallholder cash-crop production being predominant.

VISA Requirements

The eVisa for Ivory Coast is a mandatory electronic travel authorization for foreigners with a passport of any of the eligible countries. It was introduced by the Government of Ivory Coast to reduce unnecessary time at the immigration offices and make it easier to cross the border.

It is valid for 90 days since it is issued and it allows multiple entries in the country.

Requirements for eVisa for Ivory Coast

Before applying, prepare the following information:

  • A valid passport for at least 6 months from the date of your arrival
  • Return Flight ticket
  • Hotel Reservation / Lodging
  • An email address
  • A valid debit or credit card

Be aware that getting an eVisa does not guarantee entry to the country. The immigration officers will review your request with the right to deny entering Ivory Coast without any reason.

Grand-Bassam

image

Grand-Bassam is a town in south-eastern Ivory Coast, lying east of Abidjan. It was the French colonial capital city from 1893 to 1896, when the administration was transferred to Bingerville after a bout of yellow fever. The town remained a key seaport until the growth of Abidjan from the 1930s.

Grand-Bassam is a sub-prefecture of and the seat of Grand-Bassam Department; it is also a commune. The town has the aura of a ghost town, since large sections have been abandoned for decades. In 1896, the French capital was moved to Bingerville, and commercial shipping gradually declined until it virtually ceased in the 1930s. In 1960, with independence, all remaining administrative offices were transferred to Abidjan, and for many years Grand-Bassam was inhabited only by squatters. Beginning in the late 1970s, the town began to revive as a tourist destination and craft centre.

The town is divided by the Ébrié Lagoon into two halves: Ancien Bassam is the former French settlement, facing the Gulf of Guinea. It is home to the grander colonial buildings, some of which have been restored. The district is also home to a cathedral and the Ivory Coast National Museum of Costume. Nouveau Bassam, linked to Ancien Bassam by a bridge, lies on the inland, northern side of the lagoon. It grew from the African servants' quarters and is now the main commercial centre of the town.

The town is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Grand-Bassam. The diocese's cathedral is the Cathédrale Sacré Cœur in Grand-Bassam.

In 2014, the population of the sub-prefecture of Grand-Bassam was 84,028.

Abidjan

image

Abidjan is the economic capital of Ivory Coast and one of the most populous French-speaking cities in Africa. According to the 2014 census, Abidjan's population was 4.7 million, which is 20 percent of the overall population of the country, and this also makes it the sixth most populous city proper in Africa, after Lagos, Cairo, Kinshasa, Dar es Salaam, and Johannesburg. A cultural crossroads of West Africa, Abidjan is characterised by a high level of industrialisation and urbanisation.

The city expanded quickly after the construction of a new wharf in 1931, followed by its designation as the capital city of the then-French colony in 1933. Abidjan remained the capital of Côte d'Ivoire after its independence from France in 1960. The completion of the Vridi Canal in 1951 enabled Abidjan to become an important sea port. In 1983, the city of Yamoussoukro was designated as the official political capital of Côte d'Ivoire. However, almost all political institutions and foreign embassies continue to be located in Abidjan.

Because Abidjan is also the largest city in the country and the centre of its economic activity, it has officially been designated as the "economic capital" of the country. The Abidjan Autonomous District, which encompasses the city and some of its suburbs, is one of the 14 districts of Côte d'Ivoire.

Man

image

Man is a city in western Ivory Coast. It is the seat of both Montagnes District and Tonkpi Region. It is also a commune and the seat of and a sub-prefecture of Man Department. In the 2014 census, Man had a population of 188,704, making it the eighth-largest city in the country.

In November 2002, during conflict between government and rebel forces, the former rebel group Mouvement patriotique de Côte d'Ivoire (MPCI) held Man and the towns of Danané, Toulepleu, and Bloléquin.

Taï National Park

image

Taï National Park (Parc National de Taï) is a national park in Côte d'Ivoire that contains one of the last areas of primary rainforest in West Africa. It was inscribed as a World Heritage Site in 1982 due to the breadth of its flora and fauna. Five mammal species of the Taï National Park are on the Red List of Threatened Species: pygmy hippopotamus, olive colobus monkeys, leopards, chimpanzees and Jentink's duiker.

Taï National Park is approximately 100 km from the Ivoirian coast on the border with Liberia between the Cavally and Sassandra Rivers. It covers an area of 3,300 km2 with a 200 km2 buffer zone up to 396 m.

The Tai Forest reserve was created in 1926, and promoted to national park status in 1972. It was recognized as a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1978, and added to the list of Natural World Heritage Sites in 1982.

The Tai Forest is a natural reservoir of the Ebola virus. The World Health Organization has expressed concern over the proximity of this reservoir to the International Airport at Abidjan

Jacqueville

image

Jacqueville is a coastal town in southern Ivory Coast. It is a sub-prefecture of and the seat of Jacqueville Department in Grands-Ponts Region, Lagunes District. Jacqueville is also a commune. The town is 40 kilometres west of Abidjan.

Jacqueville is so named because it was the first place in Ivory Coast where the Union Jack was raised when the British originally occupied the country. It grew as a French colonial slave port, but is now primarily a fishing port and seaside resort.

Jacqueville is virtually an island, separated from most of the country by the Ébrié Lagoon, its other shore being on the Gulf of Guinea. Until March 2015, when a 776-metre bridge was opened, the only way to reach the island involved taking a ferry across the lagoon.

Jacqueville is noteworthy for the local pineapples ("ananas sauvage"), which are long narrow and have completely white and very sweet flesh. When nitrate fertilisers are used in their cultivation they become yellow and taste much more like a conventional pineapple.

In 2014, the population of the sub-prefecture of Jacqueville was 32,288.